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Health is real wealth.   >>   An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.   >>   Before thirty, men seek disease; after thirty, disease seeks men.   >>   A healthy family is sacred territory   >>   Take care of your body. It's the only place you have to live.   >>   Enhancing wellbeing to live with dignity…its beyond generating income...   >>   Better education improves the nation   >>   Right education escorts to Right Living   >>   We care we share for the future we prepare.

DIABETES SELF ASSESMENT

I check my blood sugar as often as my doctor recommends

-never

It’s a good idea to check your blood sugar regularly. Ask your doctor how often you should test your blood sugar and at what time of day. You’ll probably need to do it more often at first. Keep track of your blood sugar levels by writing them down, and share your results with your doctor at your appointments.

-sometimes

Try to check your blood sugar as often as your doctor suggests, and keep track of your results. He or she may also want you to check it if you’re sick or stressed, when you’re changing your medicine or if you’re pregnant. Many people start by checking their blood sugar twice a day, in the morning and evening. After a few weeks, your doctor may tell you that you can cut back to 2 or 3 times a week.

-usually

You’re almost there now, try to check your blood sugar as often as your doctor suggests, and keep track of your results. It’s a great way to see how your treatment is working. You can also keep track of what you’ve eaten and how active you’ve been during the day, to help you see how food and activity affect your blood sugar.

always

Great job! Keep up the good work. If you’re not doing so already, keep track of your blood sugar levels, along with what you’ve eaten and how active you’ve been.  This will help you and your doctor see how food and activity affect your blood sugar.

My blood sugar numbers are within the range my doctor recommends

-never

Make an appointment to see your doctor. It may be time to adjust your treatment to help get your blood sugar under better control. By keeping your blood sugar in your target range, you may help to reduce your risk for serious diabetes complications in the future.

-sometimes

If you’re not consistently meeting your blood sugar targets despite your best efforts, it may be time to see your doctor. He or she may want to change your treatment to help you reach your target blood sugar goals. If you’re having trouble following your doctor’s treatment plan (for example, if you’re unclear about how you should be eating), talk with your doctor or diabetes educator.

-usually

Good job! If you’re not doing so already, keep a log of your blood sugar readings, along with what you eat and how much physical activity you do. This record may help you see what’s affecting your blood sugar readings. Other things can affect your blood sugar, too, like stress or illness. If you have questions about your blood sugar, speak with your doctor.

-Always

That’s great news! By keeping your blood sugar levels in your target zone, you can help reduce your risk for diabetes complications in the future.

I get an A1C blood sugar test 2-3 times a year to see how well my sugar is controlled over several months.

-yes

Good job. Your A1C results show you and your doctor your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. A1C tests give the “big picture” of diabetes control.

-No

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) advises people with type 2 diabetes to get an A1C test at least twice a year. This is a test that your doctor gives you.You may need your level checked more often if you are not at your A1C goal or if your treatment changes.

My last A1C test result was 6.5 or less.

-yes

You’re meeting the target recommended by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, which suggests that people with type 2 diabetes have an A1C level of 6.5 percent or less. If your A1C results are significantly below 6.5, your doctor may decide that your blood sugar is too low; in that case, he or she may adjust your treatment.

-No

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends reaching an A1C level of 6.5 percent or less. By reaching and maintaining this target, you’re helping to reduce your risk for serious health related to diabetes.  A1C goals are individual, so your doctor may give you a different A1C goal.

My doctor wants me to lose weight

-yes

If your doctor says you need to lose weight, do it slowly. Work together to come up with a meal plan that will help you lose about one pound a week. Even losing a little weight can lower your blood sugar level and make you feel better.

-No

If your doctor says your weight is fine, keep up the good work. Eating a healthy diet is a good idea, whether or not you want to lose weight. Don’t forget that physical activity is still an important part of managing diabetes.

I follow my doctor’s diet recommendations

-Never

Changing how you eat can be hard, but it’s a very important part of controlling your blood sugar, even if you take medicine for your diabetes. If you don’t know how much or what you should eat, or if you’re having trouble sticking with a food plan, talk with your doctor. He or she may refer you to a nutritionist, who can give you a plan with foods that you enjoy.

-sometimes

Healthy eating is an important part of managing diabetes, whether or not your doctor wants you to lose weight. If you’re having trouble following your food plan, ask your doctor to refer you to a dietitian. He or she can create a food plan for you that features foods you like, which can help you stick with the program!

-usually

There’s no such thing as a “diabetic diet.” Still, you may be confused about what to eat, or occasionally have trouble following your food plan. Perfection isn’t the goal–what’s important is getting back on your plan as soon as possible after you’ve had a setback. If you want help with healthy eating, speak with your doctor, diabetes educator or nutritionist.

-always

Congratulations! Eating healthy is key to managing type 2 diabetes. There may be times when you have trouble following your eating plan–if and when that happens, the important thing is to get past your setback, and get back on track. Don’t beat yourself up.

I do as much physical activity each week as my doctor recommends

-never

Physical activity is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes, and your weight.  Try not to get overwhelmed by the thought of being active. Start slowly. Walking is a great way to begin, and you don’t need any special equipment.  Try walking the mall, or taking a lunchtime stroll with a friend. Build up the length, speed and frequency of your walks. Ask your doctor for a goal.

-sometimes

Look for ways to include more physical activity into your schedule. If it’s inconvenient, you’ll have a harder time sticking with it. Don’t set yourself up for failure by giving yourself unrealistic goals, like working out every day for 2 hours. Find activities you like, and keep them varied so you don’t get bored.

-usually

It can take time to make physical activity a part of your life. If you’re getting tired of your routine, shake it up. Look for ways to make activity fun, whether it’s doing it with someone else (or in a group), joining a club, or trying something new.

-always

Nice work! The great news about physical activity is that it helps your body in so many ways, not just controlling your blood sugar. Try to avoid exercise burnout by varying your activities, and don’t beat yourself up if you miss a day. Just get back into your routine as soon as you can.

I take my diabetes medicine(s) as my doctor prescribed

-yes

Many people with type 2 diabetes need one or more medicines to control their blood sugar. Make sure to test your blood sugar regularly and keep track of your results. This will help you and your doctor see how well your current treatment is managing your type 2 diabetes. Keep taking your medicine even when you’re at your blood sugar target.

-no

For many people with type 2 diabetes, medication is key to controlling their blood sugar. If you’re having side effects that make it hard to stay on your treatment, talk with your doctor. He or she may adjust your dose or change your medicine. If you’re having trouble paying for your medicine, many drug companies have programs to help people get the treatment they need. The Partnership For Prescription Assistance (www.pparx.org) is a centralized source of information on hundreds of prescription drug programs.

I’m experiencing one or more of the following: Blurred vision; tingling, numbness or burning in hands, legs or feet; wounds that won’t heal; sexual dysfunction; red, sore or bleeding gums

-yes

If you’re having one or more of these symptoms, your blood sugar may not be under control. Speak with your doctor right away.

-no

These are some of the common symptoms of high blood sugar. However, your blood sugar may be high without you having any symptoms. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar yourself and get an A1C test at least twice a year. These tests will help you and your doctor see if you’re reaching your blood sugar targets.

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